Morris v. Ernst & Young, LLP update

For those of you who recognized that the Ninth Circuit got it 100% right when it found in Morris v. Ernst & Young, LLP (9th Cir. Aug. 22, 2016) that an arbitration agreement that precludes collective actions violates rights protected by the NLRA, you may wish to know where things stand with that case on further appeal.  Right now, Morris is before the U.S. Supreme Court on a Petition for Writ of Certiorari.  Here is the Docket report:

  • Sep 8 2016:  Petition for a writ of certiorari filed. (Response due October 11, 2016)
  • Sep 21 2016:  Consent to the filing of amicus curiae briefs, in support of either party or of neither party, received from counsel for petitioners.
  • Sep 29 2016:  Consent to the filing of amicus curiae briefs, in support of either party or of neither party, received from counsel for respondents
  • Oct 3 2016: Brief amici curiae of National Association of Manufacturers, et al. filed. VIDED.
  • Oct 3 2016: Brief amicus curiae of Chamber of Commerce of the United States filed.
  • Oct 6 2016: Order extending time to file response to petition to and including November 14, 2016.
  • Oct 7 2016: Brief amicus curiae of International Association of Defense Counsel filed.
  • Oct 10 2016: Brief amicus curiae of Atlantic Legal Foundation filed.
  • Oct 11 2016: Brief amicus curiae of The Employers Group filed.
  • Oct 11 2016: Brief amicus curiae of The Retail Litigation Center, Inc. filed.
  • Oct 11 2016: Brief amicus curiae of The Business Roundtable filed.
  • Oct 11 2016: Brief amicus curiae of New England Legal Foundation filed.
  • Nov 15 2016: Order further extending time to file response to petition to and including November 21, 2016.
  • Nov 21 2016: Brief of respondents Stephen Morris, et al. in opposition filed.

Just look at those busy amicus filers.  I bet all those employers are telling the Supreme Court that the world would end in fire and death if they couldn't block class actions for wage and hour violations with arbitration agreements that employees have to sign to work.

An exceptional oral argument on the D.R. Horton arbitration issue

One of the things that had me preoccupied recently was an oral argument in the Ninth Circuit.  Coincidentally, the same day that I was there, Dennis Moss, one of my former employers, was arguing his own case before the Ninth Circuit.  In Fatemeh Johnmohammadi v. Bloomingdale's, Inc., the same issue of Section 7 and 8 rights running up against class action waivers addressed in D.R. Horton was raised.  You can listen to the argument here.  In light of the Fifth Circuit's decision (which I haven't yet written about), it seems like a better than typical bet that if the Ninth Circuit were somehow convinced to part company with the Fifth Circuit, the Supreme Court would end up with the final say on this debate.